Inchinatown's Blog

February 15, 2012

Filed under: Art,China-contemporary,Current affairs — by inchinatown @ 11:29 pm
Tags: , , , ,

The China Research Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney has a stimulating program of seminars presented by members of the CRC and visiting scholars. All sessions are free and open to all. Here are some upcoming events. To register or be placed on the mailing list contact Claire Moore at Claire.Moore@uts.edu.au .

DATE: 29 February 2012 – 23 May 2012 TIME: 12.30 – 2.00pm (Unless otherwise indicated below)

LOCATION: FASS Conference Room, Level 5, 235-253 Jones Street, Ultimo (unless otherwise indicated)

Wednesday 29 February 2012

Screening of Ivan Franceschini’s film Dreamwork China  followed by Q&A moderated by Dr Jenny Chio

Location: CB10.14.201 (UTS Building 10, 235-253 Jones Street, Level 14, Room 201)

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Wednesday 14 March 2012

Professor Carolyn Cartier The Geography of Power in China: Urban Expansion and Administrative Empire

Location: FASS Conference Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Wednesday 28 March 2012

Andris Heks presents The Significance of Ai Weiwei: with a comparison of literary dissent in Communist Hungary

Location: FASS Confernece Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Saturday 14 April 2012

Wang Xu, with Feng Chongyi, He Yuhuai, and Shen Jiawei Rightists in the eyes of Chinese artists in commemoration of the 55th Anniversary of the Anti-Rightist campaign.

Location: UTS Venue TBC

Time: 10.00am-5.00pm

RSVP here no later than Wednesday 11 April (for catering purposes).

 Thursday 19 April 2012

Anne-Marie Brady The Velvet Fist in the Velvet Glove: New Approaches to Social and Political Control in China

Location: UTS Venue TBC

Time: Drinks from 5.30pm for a 6.00pm start

RSVP here no later than Monday 16 April 2012 (for catering purposes)

Wednesday 02 May 2012

Professor Anita Chan presents Working Conditions in China’s Automobile Industry: Some Preliminary Findings

Location: FASS Conference Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Wednesday 23 May 2012

Dr Jane Zheng speaks about her current research project/s

Location: FASS Conference Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Current Research on China at UTS

Filed under: Uncategorized — by inchinatown @ 11:24 pm

The China Research Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney has a stimulating program of seminars presented by members of the CRC and visiting scholars. All sessions are free and open to all. Here are some upcoming events. To register or be placed on the mailing list contact Claire Moore at Claire.Moore@uts.edu.au .

DATE: 29 February 2012 – 23 May 2012 TIME: 12.30 – 2.00pm (Unless otherwise indicated below)

LOCATION: FASS Conference Room, Level 5, 235-253 Jones Street, Ultimo (unless otherwise indicated)

Wednesday 29 February 2012

Screening of Ivan Franceschini’s film Dreamwork China  followed by Q&A moderated by Dr Jenny Chio

Location: CB10.14.201 (UTS Building 10, 235-253 Jones Street, Level 14, Room 201)

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

 

Wednesday 14 March 2012

Professor Carolyn Cartier The Geography of Power in China: Urban Expansion and Administrative Empire

Location: FASS Conference Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Wednesday 28 March 2012

Andris Heks presents The Significance of Ai Weiwei: with a comparison of literary dissent in Communist Hungary

Location: FASS Confernece Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Saturday 14 April 2012

Wang Xu, with Feng Chongyi, He Yuhuai, and Shen Jiawei Rightists in the eyes of Chinese artists in commemoration of the 55th Anniversary of the Anti-Rightist campaign.

Location: UTS Venue TBC

Time: 10.00am-5.00pm

RSVP here no later than Wednesday 11 April (for catering purposes).

 Thursday 19 April 2012

Anne-Marie Brady The Velvet Fist in the Velvet Glove: New Approaches to Social and Political Control in China

Location: UTS Venue TBC

Time: Drinks from 5.30pm for a 6.00pm start

RSVP here no later than Monday 16 April 2012 (for catering purposes)

Wednesday 02 May 2012

Professor Anita Chan presents Working Conditions in China’s Automobile Industry: Some Preliminary Findings

Location: FASS Conference Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

Wednesday 23 May 2012

Dr Jane Zheng speaks about her current research project/s

Location: FASS Conference Room

Time: 12.30pm-2.00pm

February 9, 2012

Breathe: varied works by women of Chinese ancestry

Megan Keating, Li Baoying, Roslyn Yeung & Suna Xie. Cindy Chen's ' Soundscape-Karniya Metta Sutta' on the left, Megan Keating's 'Exhale' on the right.

Six artists and curator Imogen Yang  gathered at Art Atrium http://www.artatrium.com.au/exhibitions.html on February 3 to talk about their work, an enthusiastic audience in attendance. In the gallery’s intimate space the artists were generous in talking of their backgrounds, inspirations,  and artworks. Penang -born  Cindy Chen’s work ‘Soundscape-Karaniya Metta Sutta’ explores the emotional and psychological effect of sound on our experience of home. It is inspired by the sounds of her mother’s daily Buddhist chants.

Cindy Chen and Li Cui

Li Cui was born in China, relocating to Australia only 14 months ago. Previously she had no idea that many millions people of Chinese ancestry live outside of China. The Chinese diaspora has become a source of fascination. Her paintings, Golden Age I, II and III, use the motifs of embroidered shoes, bridal sedan and phoenix crown as “symbols of Chinese culture that are carried on by Chinese immigrants despite their living out of China. ”

Suna Xie grew up in rural China and Li Baoying’s family is also from rural China. After extended time in England and Australia as well as China, Suna explores her ‘ unresolved thoughts around identity ‘ as a ’36 year old migrant Chinese woman’ in “36 years” . This work features stones gathered from the South coast of New South Wales fused with elements of northern Chinese and English food as well as natural elements from Australia. The work also includes handmade books in which Suna writes about 36 issues that she has faced, one for each year of her life.

'36 Years' by Suna Xie

A stone from '36 years'

Beiing-born Li Baoying’s work is now focused on the wilderness landscape of Tasmania. Trained as a painter, Li Baoying’s current works are photographic and may be viewed at http://www.baoyingli.com/ .

Roslyn Yeung and Megan Keating were born in Australia, Roslyn’s parents migrating from Hong Kong. Roslyn’s work, “To what shall I compare this life of ours? Even before I can say it is like a lightning flash on a dewdrop it is no more’  is a response to the  Victorian bushfires of Black Saturday on February 7th, 2008 during which two friends died.

Megan is an adoptee who discovered recently that her  birth mother was Chinese. Her collection of works, ‘Exhale’, explores the inability of language or text to fully express ‘the range and profundity of so much of human experience.’ This work has a  modern graphic appearance  created using the  traditional,labour intensive  stencil cutting technique of katagami.  The use of mica leads to a mirror effect. Megan Keating adds “These works are ambiguous utterings, silent fragile moments, fleeting moments that can’t be pinned down with certainty.’

It was a pleasure and a privilege to meet these fascinating women of varied Chinese ancestry and to view their art.

By Helen Fong         Follow me on twitter at @helenchinatown

January 17, 2012

Chinese New Year Sydney 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — by inchinatown @ 6:46 am
Tags: , , ,

Every year Sydney’s Chinese New  Year festival becomes a bigger production. The City of Sydney Council pours money into the festival as it’s seen as a significant tourist attractor. The program for 2012 has 64 pages and may be downloaded from sydneychinesenewyear.com. Some events are already booked out. Here are some that caught my eye.

17-28 January Noon-8pm   Redgate Gallery:Two generations

Centennial Hall, Sydney Town Hall, George St, Sydney
10 internationally acclaimed artists from Beijing’s Redgate Gallery exhibit alongside selected emerging artists.

14,15, 21, 22, 28, 29 January Chinese Tea Appreciation Workshop & Yumcha

Zensation Tea House, 656 Bourke Street, Surry Hills $45 pp

I have attended one of these sessions. They’re such a brilliant way to relax and unwind with friends, I’m planning to go again.

29 January 8pm Twilight Chinese New Year Parade
From Sydney Town Hall to Chinatown. Free. Seating $66.
There’s nothing like a parade. This one will feature performers from Chengdu.

1 February 6pm-7.30pm History of Chinese Cuisine by Dr Richard Wu
Education Building, Manning Road, Camperdown Campus, Sydney Uni.

If Dr Wu is the psychiatrist who spoke about Chinese art at the Nicholson Museum, Sydney University, 2011 I expect this talk will be a scholarly treat.02 91140760

3 February 8pm     4A Centre for Contemporary Art,

Cinema Alley in Parker St, Haymarket

Outdoor  screening of video works by Australian and Asian artists. Free. Bookings essential at 4a.com.au or 02 9212 0380.

6-12 February , 2012 Golden Koala Chinese Film Festival,

Dendy Opera Quays. $17 per ticket. Program at ccf.org.au

23-25 February, The Quiet Brother

A new play by Ivy Mak. Belvoir Street, $25-$20. Bookings at australasianartandstageworks.com

27 January-18 February, “Breathe”, a show by women of Chinese ancestry, exploring physical and metaphysical ideas of breath and breathing space in their lives.

Art Atrium, 181 Old South Head Road, Bondi Junction artatrium.com.au

28 January 10am to 5pm Korea Town Lunar New Year Festival

Pitt street, between Liverpool & Bathurst Streets, Sydney. Free. K-pop contest. skba.com.au

29 January 1pm, Book launch “Humour in Chinese Life & Letters: Classical and traditional approaches”

Book written by Dr Jessica Milner Davis and Professor Jocelyn Chey.

Art Gallery of NSW, Centenary Auditorium, Art Gallery Road, Domain. Free

There are art exhibitions, workshops, performances, tours and much more. If you will be in Sydney, make yourself a cup of tea or coffee, put your feet up and browse the program to plan for the launch of the Year of the Dragon. sydneychinesenewyear.com

November 28, 2011

Looking for Signs of Chinese Settlement in Central Queensland

Filed under: Uncategorized — by inchinatown @ 4:57 am
Tags: , ,

During my July 2011 trip to central Queensland (Bob Katter’s electorate) for a science excursion with my then 15 year old, I kept an eye out for signs of Chinese settlement. Our schedule was rigid (7am on the coach) so there was no time for systematic research .Here are some interesting things I found:
Winton- One Hundred Years of Settlement 1875-1975
The Shire of Winton’s commemorative booklet published in 1975 has a paragragh on the Chinese who arrived in the area around 1882. “One of the great features of the early race meetings was a Chinaman’s race, when all the Chinamen brought their horses to the course-piebald included- and rode them themselves. It was the event of the day, as many of them could just about hold on. Their pigtales soaring in the air.”
The booklet concludes the section on the Chinese with ” By 1896, they had reached such importance in the town , that people were dependent on them, especially for their bread, as Yee Hap and Sun Kum Wah were the two bakers here then.”

Fossil Discovery Centre at Hughenden
In a dated (20 years old) but otherwise effective audio visual presentation the only mention of Chinese was as strikebreakers during the Great Queensland Shearers’ Strike of 1891. The Chinese were by no means the only shearers working for the squatters against the union, but this “information” about the Chinese strikebreakers is transmitted to every visitor who views the video.

Books by women with Chinese connections
During a morning tea stop I visited a local information centre where I picked up books by Anna Chu (New Guinean and Chinese heritage) and Molly Chong (Irish and Aboriginal) who married Willie Chong (Aboriginal and apparently of Chinese heritage). Anna Chu’s book “Kapiak Tree”, published by masmedia.com.au, tells of how her father, Chu Leong, from Canton was encouraged by local people to ask for Arikin Apotapu , a New Guinea native woman ,as his wife  in settlement of a debt. Anna Chu writes an engaging account of  living in between the native New  Guinea world and the white world in Angoram, where her father was the only Chinese. Chu Leong had arrived in New Guinea in the 1920s when the schooner of which he was master had struck a reef on the New Guinea coast and been lost. Chu lost his master’s ticket so established a store at Mareinberg, the first on the Sepik River.

After Chu Leong died in 1966, trustees of his estate came in a chartered aircraft to take all the money from the shop. The family was told to keep the business going until all the goods were sold and then to close the door. Not until 1984 did his New Guinea family receive a small portion of Chu Leong’s estate. Anna Chu believes that the majority of the state went to the son of his first wife who had moved to Hong Kong from Canton. In 1960 Chu Leong had returned to Hong Kong for the first time since coming to New Guinea.

June 8, 2011

A Good Time to be An Artist in Beijing

Filed under: Uncategorized — by inchinatown @ 1:37 am
Tags: , , ,

Australian Chinese artist Laurens Tan is back in Sydney for a flying visit. For the past 5 years his home and studio have been in Beijing. Talking about why he made the move to Beijing, Laurens said,
“After 28 years working as an artist and as academic I wanted to see where I could go that could be liberating; I wanted to go somewhere that was open-ended and open-minded,”. In an article , “Beijing Calling” in The Australian , Brendan Shanahan tells about Beijing’s vibrant artist community that has a surprising number of foreigners, including Australians . Beijing’s attractions include “enormous, cheap studios in a sophisticated metropolis, access to world art markets, a constant stream of stimulating company, a “can do” attitude and the chance to dig into an ancient and rapidly changing culture.” (When can I go ???)
Read the entire article here:
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/beijing-calling/story-e6frg8n6-1226066980453

I caught Laurens Tan’s show, Happy Toy, at Art Atrium on June 4, 2011. The show included sculptures, animations and images, displaying the artist’s gift for analysis,synthesis and fun. Most appealing to me were Laurens’ Cheng Yu series. ( A cheng yu is a common 4 character idiom expressing an element of Chinese philosophy or culture. Cheng yu can be useful in daily life.) In his presentation of each cheng yu, Laurens invites us to consider tradition, change and modernity , all at the same time. Laurens Tans’ portfolio can be viewed here:

http://www.octomat.com/portfolio/doe.html

May 12, 2010

Writer Su Tong in Sydney

Filed under: Chinese writer — by inchinatown @ 1:10 am
Tags: , ,

On Monday 17 May 2010, 5-7:00pm  there will be a public lecture by Su Tong as part of the Sydney Writers’ Festival.
Public Lecture: Su Tong: China’s Faulkner in Conversation with Dr Yiyan Wang and Professor Yuanbao Gao

At this lecture, Dr Yiyan Wang, Chair of Chinese Studies at the School of Languages and Cultures and Professor Gao Yuanbao, Deputy Director of the University of Sydney Confucius Institute will discuss key issues such as:

·        Su Tong’s understanding and construction of the small towns in China’s Jiangnan regions in the context of China’s ‘national culture’.

·        His primary ideas and intentions regarding his portrayal of Chinese cultural and social traditions.

·        His views on the film adaptations of his short stories ‘Raise the Red Lantern’ and ‘Blush’.

Venue: Old Teachers College Lecture Theatre 448

Camperdown Campus, The University of Sydney

Entry Fee: FREE

Bookings: Not required

For further information on the Sydney Writers’ Festival, please visit: http://www.swf.org.au/<http://www.swf.org.au/>

May 5, 2010

Chen Ping exhibition at Art Equity

Filed under: Art — by inchinatown @ 6:44 am
Tags: , ,

Chen Ping, an artist formally trained in the China, who combines western expressionism with eastern sensibility   will exhibit new paintings at Art Equity from 13-28 May 2010.

Venue: Art Equity, 16-20 Barrack St, Sydney

Telephone: 922 6660

Email: info@artequity.com.au

http://www.artequity.com.au

Yin Yang, Lao Tzu, Wind

April 16, 2010

One night only-Stories East and West

Don’t miss this. I saw a shorter performance of this work  in development last year and

loved every moment. This piece resonated with so many people that Performance 4A

decided to put on a longer version at Belvoir Street Theatre so that more people can see it.

Master storyteller  and photographer William Yang  has trained six Asian-Australians to tell

their own stories and share  photographs from their private family collections. Well known actor, writer and

performer Annette Shun- Wah has contributed her talents as a writer and producer.

This presentation is extremely moving and reminds us of how varied, rich and complex

the experience of Asians living in western countries can be. Not one cliche in the

whole presentation. Prepare to be surprised  and moved. And also to laugh.

Performance 4a and Company B Belvoir present

eastwest_postcard_image.jpg

Directed by renowned storyteller, photographer and performer William Yang

and producer/writer Annette Shun Wah.

Monday 3 May at 8.00pm

ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY

Belvoir St Upstairs Theatre
25 Belvoir St,Surry Hills

Six storytellers confront their family skeletons to flesh out the stories of the

here and now. Accompanied by images from private collections, they reveal

engaging and moving insights into family, identity, ambition, confusion and

determination.

Daphne Lowe Kelley’s mother leaves the family village for the first time,

crossing oceans in search of a missing husband. Father, now a lingerie

salesman, didn’t know what was coming….

Poet Mary Tang’s Chinese horoscope predicted she would bring bad luck,

so her family gave her away. She recounts the many ways in which she is

lucky to be alive.

Choreographer/performer Paul Cordeiro’s mother almost had him

convinced of their English ancestry, until his aunty said: “but look at our

eyes”. How does he deal with being “not exactly Chinese”?

Actor/writer Joy Hopwood relates her arduous, but often hilarious quest

– to become a Playschool presenter.

Malaysian-Chinese actor Teik-Kim Pok explores his boyhood fascination

with the west within a family characterised by niggles between middle class

relatives and the “country hicks”.

Visual artist Mai Long’s artwork ignited controversy for some in the

Vietnamese community, but brings her a better understanding of her

family, particularly her dad, who was “not a communicator”.

Tickets: $25 (Concessions $20)
Bookings: www.belvoir.com.au or 02 9699 3444

Artist talk: Brett Bailey at Art Atrium

Filed under: Art — by inchinatown @ 11:54 am
Tags: ,

You are invited to an artist’s talk by 2009 AGNSW Wynne Prize finalist Brett Bailey at Art Atrium on his latest series of paintings.

The current exhibition showcases Bailey’s latest body of work, which illustrates his continued assimilation of Chinese and Japanese ideas of “painting the world” and the loving scrutiny, internalization and evocation of the Australian landscape.

Details for the talk :

Date:                       Saturday 24 April 2010

Time:                       2.00pm – 3.30pm

Venue:                     Art Atrium

181 Old South Head Road, Bondi Junction NSW 2022

RSVP:                       Simon Chan

0411 138 308 or info@artatrium.com.au

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